5 Compelling Facts About Infusion Therapy

Infusion therapy could be the answer to controlling your pain. You may benefit from infusion therapy if:

Infusion therapy is a type of intravenous (IV) therapy in which your medical provider administers the medications you need straight into your bloodstream.

Infusion therapy bypasses your gastrointestinal system altogether. Infusion therapy may be your only choice if the medication you need is compromised by stomach acid.

Our expert rheumatologists at the Rheumatology Center of New Jersey offer infusion therapies for rheumatoid arthritis, gout, osteoporosis, and other conditions at our three New Jersey offices. If your doctor recommends infusion therapy, here are five compelling facts you need to know.

Infusion therapy is pain-free

If you have a fear of needles, you may be reluctant to sit attached to an IV for an hour or more. But rest assured that infusion therapy is pain-free. We may recommend taking a painkiller, such as acetaminophen before your treatment.  

You sit comfortably in a chair while you receive your infusion therapy. You can listen to music, meditate, read, or use your smartphone. Most infusion therapies only take about an hour — including setup — but a few take up to four hours to complete.

Infusion therapy is effective

At the Rheumatology Center of New Jersey, we only recommend infusion therapies that are clinically proven to offer relief from pain and inflammation. Some infusion therapies calm your immune system. Others help you build new bone. 

The drugs we offer as infusion therapies include:

Your rheumatologist may recommend infusion therapy to replace or supplement your current medication regimen.

Infusion therapy goes right to work

When you take a medication orally, it must be processed by your GI system. That’s why you may not feel any symptom relief for at least 20-30 minutes. With IV therapy, the medication is delivered into a vein, so your circulatory system can distribute it immediately to your tissues and joints.

Infusion therapy, therefore, alleviates your symptoms more quickly than oral medications. And because nothing is lost to or compromised by digestion, more of the medication is available to do its work. 

Conditions that may benefit from IV therapy include:

Infusion therapy may be appropriate for other inflammatory conditions, too. Unlike oral medications, IV therapies produce few to no side effects.

Infusion therapy is covered by most insurance

While certain kinds of infusion therapies — such as nonprescription vitamin infusions — aren’t covered by insurance, we prescribe FDA-cleared infusion therapies to help our patients heal and grow stronger. Most insurance policies cover prescribed infusion therapies.

If you’re not sure whether your insurance will pay for your infusion therapy, contact them directly. We can provide them with a prescription to ensure you get the reimbursement to which you’re entitled.

Infusion therapy is long-lasting

In addition to being short-acting, infusion therapy is long-lasting. You may only need to come for infusion therapy once a month, several times a year, or just once a year. We let you know what schedule is best for your condition.

To find out if infusion therapy is right for you, call our nearest location in Somerville, Flemington, or Monroe, New Jersey. You can also request an appointment using our online tool.

You Might Also Enjoy...

What to Expect During Your Bone Scan

If you’re ready for your first bone scan, you may wonder what’s involved. Will it hurt? Does it take a long time? Do you have to prepare ahead of time? A bone scan is an essential part of keeping tabs on your health as you age. Here’s what to expect.

The Link Between Sun Sensitivity and Lupus

If you have lupus, chances are you’re extra sensitive to the damaging effects of the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays. While everyone should limit their UVA and UVB exposure to minimize skin cancer risk, when you have lupus, the stakes are even higher.

Is Arthritis Hereditary?

You love family gatherings for the good food, good vibes, and all the memories you share and make. But you’ve noticed something: A lot of your older relatives have arthritis. Their gnarled fingers and hobbling gaits worry you. Are you next?

Eating Tips to Help Minimize Gout Flare-Ups

Gout is a form of arthritis in which needle-like crystals form in the soft tissues of your joints, particularly your big toe joint. If you’ve had an attack of gout, the last thing you want is another. Here’s how to reduce gout flare-ups.

Is Your Hair Loss Due to Lupus?

When you start losing your hair, you might think it’s just due to aging or to hormonal changes. But hair loss can be a symptom of a serious autoimmune disease called lupus. Untreated, lupus may damage your skin, organs, and joints.