Learn How to Slow Down the Progression of Your Psoriatic Arthritis

Learn How to Slow Down the Progression of Your Psoriatic Arthritis

Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a painful and frustrating complication of the autoimmune disease psoriasis, which causes red, rashy, swollen skin. 

If you have PsA, your joints may become difficult to move, swollen, and painful. You may develop PsA in your fingers and toes first, particularly if your psoriasis affects your fingernails or toenails.

Our expert rheumatologists, Ahmed M. Abdel-Megid, MD, and Amanda Borham, MD, diagnose and treat psoriatic arthritis at the Rheumatology Center of New Jersey

If you’d like to slow down the progress of your disease so you can stay as mobile and pain-free as possible, read on for our tips.

Exercise, build muscles, and stretch

Although your painful joints might disagree at first, the best thing for PsA is to stay active, limber, and strong. Exercise floods your joints (and the rest of your body) with oxygen and nutrients and helps them wash away toxins. 

Moving your joints has an added benefit: It helps them stay lubricated. Your joints are covered by a special tissue called the synovium. When you move your joints, the synovium produces and coats your joints with synovial fluid so they glide freely and painlessly.

Although walking and light stretching are good first steps to keep your joints mobile, healthy, and limber, you should also try to build muscle through resistance training. When your muscles are strong, they take some of the load and stress off your joints.

We work with you to design an activity and exercise program that takes you from your baseline and builds toward a complete routine that incorporates stretching, resistance training, and cardio. Physical activities that are easy on your joints include:

Warm up before and cool down after exercise to avoid pulling a muscle, tendon, or ligament. Start your resistance training by doing exercises that rely solely on your body weight or the use of resistant bands. 

Working with a physical therapist or a trainer helps you get stronger and more mobile faster with less risk of injury.

Adopt a noninflammatory diet

You can enjoy a rich, vibrant, flavorful diet that allows you to feel full and satisfied, while simultaneously avoiding foods that promote inflammation. Inflammation is a tool that your immune system uses to attack pathogens in an acute state, such as an injury. 

But chronic inflammation is at the root of many diseases, including arthritis. Eliminate pro-inflammatory foods, including:

Shop the periphery of your grocery store, where all the fresh foods are kept, such as vegetables, fruits, fish, and pastured or grass-fed meats, poultry, and eggs. 

Switch to the Mediterranean diet, MIND diet, or a flexible ketogenic diet to easily and deliciously increase the number of fresh, healthy foods you eat.

Eliminate excess weight … and stress

Both physical and mental stress take their toll on your joints. If you’re obese or overweight, simply losing those extra pounds takes the weight off painful, stiff joints.

Ridding yourself of mental burdens also relaxes your muscles and lets your body function more naturally and easily. Try meditation, deep breathing, and socializing to give yourself an emotional vent. 

Acupuncture and massage are supportive therapies that help you relax. Each can minimize pain in your joints, too.

Turn down inflammation and pain

Although lifestyle adjustments can go a long way toward slowing the progression of PsA, you may still need some extra help to ease the swelling and pain in your joints. We may recommend:

Although there’s no cure for psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis, you don’t have to suffer unnecessarily. Call us today for treatment and relief. You may also request an appointment with our online tool. Our offices are located in Somerville, Flemington, and Monroe, New Jersey.

You Might Also Enjoy...

How PRP Therapy Can Help Clot Your Blood

When you get injured, your body goes into high gear to try to heal your wounds as quickly as possible. Part of the process is clotting your blood so you stop bleeding. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) therapy helps you do it faster and better.

5 Types of Arthritis

Do you have arthritis? If so, which type? If you don’t know, you may not be making optimal treatment and management decisions. Learn more about the different types of arthritis and how to manage them.

Does Gout Only Affect the Big Toe?

Gout is a form of arthritis that typically affects the big toe. You may be most familiar with gout through TV and movies about people (usually men) who suffer from it. But gout can affect almost anyone and may appear in other joints, too.

4 Potential Benefits of PRP Therapy

Platelet-rich plasma therapy takes holistic medicine and self-care to a whole new level by using your own blood components to fire up healing in your body. In addition to being natural and biocompatible, PRP has other potential benefits.

Common Symptoms and Signs of Polymyalgia Rheumatica

As you age, it seems the bad news never stops. In addition to osteoarthritis, once you’re over 50 you’re at risk for another condition that affects the way your joints and muscles feel: polymyalgia rheumatica. The good news is, you can get relief. Not only

Do You Have Psoriatic Arthritis?

About a third of women, men, and children who have psoriasis develop a painful joint condition called psoriatic arthritis (PsA), which has symptoms that are similar to those of rheumatoid arthritis. Do you have PsA? Take this quiz to find out.